Archive for December, 2019

GERMAN AIR RAID HITS LONDON IN 1940

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German bomber flying over Britain during the Blitz.


On the evening of December 29, 1940, London suffers its most devastating
air raid when Germans firebomb the city. Hundreds of fires caused by the
exploding bombs engulfed areas of London, but firefighters showed a
valiant indifference to the bombs falling around them and saved much
of the city from destruction. The next day, a newspaper photo of St. Paul’s Cathedral standing undamaged amid the smoke and flames seemed to
symbolize the capital’s unconquerable spirit during the
Battle of Britain.

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The dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, visible through smoke generated by German incendiary bombs.

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UNITED FLIGHT 173 DOWN ON THIS DAY IN 1978

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United Airlines Flight 173 was a scheduled flight from John F.
Kennedy International
Airport
in New York City to Portland
International Airport
 in Portland, Oregon, with a scheduled stop
in
Denver
, Colorado. On December 28, 1978, the aircraft flying
this route ran out of fuel while troubleshooting a landing gear
problem and crashed in a suburban
Portland neighborhood
near NE 157th Avenue and East
Burnside Street killing 10
people. 

  



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Flight 173 was piloted by an experienced cockpit crew,
consisting of Captain Malburn McBroom (above), First
Officer Roderick "Rod" Beebe, and Flight Engineer
Forrest Mendenhall.  McBroom had been with United
Airlines for 27 years; he was one of the airline’s most
senior pilots with more than 27,600 hours of flight time,
of which about 5,500 hours had been as a DC-8 captain.

Note{McBroom died on October 9, 2004 at age 77.

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The crash site of United flight 173 as it looks today.

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posted by Bob Karm in AIRCRAFT,ANNIVERSARY,Aviation,Aviation disaster,DEATH,HISTORY,THEN AND NOW and have No Comments

POPULAR RADIO HOST HAS DIED AT 79

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John Donald Imus Jr. (July 23, 1940 – December 27, 2019)

Don  Imus was a radio personality, television show host, recording
artist, and author. He was known for his radio show
Imus in the
Morning
which aired on various stations and digital platforms
nationwide until his retirement in March of  2018.

In March 2009, Imus was diagnosed with stage 2 prostate cancer. He
was hospitalized at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center in
College
Station
, Texas, on December 24, 2019. The exact cause of his death
was not immediately reported.

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posted by Bob Karm in Author,CURRENT EVENTS,DEATH,HISTORY,News release,RADIO,TV and have No Comments

HISTORY WAS MADE ON THIS DAY

Today-In-Historytitle

Ross-ap-3
ROSS SIMPSON

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Charles Robert Darwin ( February 12, 1809 – April 19, 1832)

On this day in 1831, English naturlist Charles Darwin set out on a
voyage to the Pacific aboard the HMS Beagle. His discoveries
during the voyage helped him form the basis of his theories on
evolution.


HMS Beagle, a 10-gun, Cherokee-class brig sloop of the Royal
Navy’s survey service, sets sail from Plymouth, England on its
second voyage as a survey vessel. On board, at the invitation
of Beagle captain Robert FitzRoy, is a young biologist called
Charles Darwin.

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Evolution,HISTORY,MUSIC,Musical,Play,Soviet Union,Voyage and have No Comments

GOVERNMENT CONTROL OF RAILROADS, 1917

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Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924)

Eight months after the United States enters World War I on behalf of the Allies, President Woodrow Wilson (above) announced the nationalization of a large majority of the country’s railroads under the Federal Possession and Control
Act.

The U.S. entry into the war in April 1917 coincided with a downturn in the
fortunes of the nation’s railroads: rising taxes and operations costs,
combined with prices that were fixed by law, had pushed many railroad
companies into receivership as early as late 1915. A year later, in a last-
minute bill passed through Congress, Wilson had forced the railroad
management to accept union demands for an eight-hour work day. Still,
many skilled workers were leaving the cash-poor railroads to work in the
booming armaments industry or to enlist in the war effort.

By the end of 1917, it seemed that the existing railroad system was not up
to the task of supporting the war effort and Wilson decided on nationalization.

Two days after his announcement, the U.S. Railroad Administration (USRA)
seized control. William McAdoo, Wilson’s secretary of the treasury, was 
appointed Director General of Railroads. They were subsequently divided
into three divisions—East, West and South. Passenger services were
streamlined, eliminating a significant amount of inessential travel. Over
100,000 new railroad cars and 1,930 steam engines were ordered–designed
to the latest standards–at a total cost of $380 million.

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,HISTORY,President,Railroad,Transportation,WAR and have No Comments