Archive for the 'Navy' Category

HISTORY WAS MADE ON THIS DAY

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sandy kozel 3
SANDY KOZEL

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George Burns (born Nathan Birnbaum)
(January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996)

George Burns has three stars on the Hollywood
Walk of Fame
: a motion pictures star at 1639 Vine
Street
, a television star at 6510 Hollywood Boulevard,
and a live performance star. Burns is also a member
of the
Television Hall of Fame, where he and Gracie
Allen
were both inducted in 1988.

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The Famous comedy duo of George Burns and Gracie Allen.

George Burns & Gracie Allen were not only
married in real life, their work from the
mid-1930s through the mid-1950s made them
one of the biggest comedy duos in Hollywood.

posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Battle,Cold War,Comedian,Communism,DEATH,HISTORY,MUSIC,Navy,Newscaster and have No Comments

IT WAS ON THIS DAY IN 1941

The Attack on Pearl Harbor - YouTube

Remembering Pearl Harbor: Comparing news headlines from around the world |  Blog | findmypast.com

The Path to Pearl Harbor | The National WWII Museum | New Orleans

Headlines & photos: Japan bombs Pearl Harbor in Hawaii - US declares war &  joins WWII (1941) - Click Americana

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NAVY FLIGHT 19 LOST ON THIS DAY IN 1945

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At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers comprising
Flight 19 took off from the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in
Florida
on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to
take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back
over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base.
They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who
had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that
his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position
was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the
location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two
more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

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posted by Bob Karm in AIRCRAFT,ANNIVERSARY,Aviation,Bermuda Triangle,Bomber,HISTORY,Maps,Missing,Navy and have No Comments

ACADEMY OPENED ON THIS DAY IN 1845

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The United States Naval Academy opened in Annapolis, Maryland,
with 50 midshipmen students and seven professors. Known as the
Naval School until 1850, the curriculum included mathematics and navigation, gunnery and steam, chemistry, English, French along
with natural philosophy.

The Naval School officially became the U.S. Naval Academy in 1850,
and a new curriculum went into effect, requiring midshipmen to
study at the academy for four years and to train aboard ships each

summer—the basic format that remains at the academy to this day. 


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posted by Bob Karm in Academy,ANNIVERSARY,HISTORY,MILITARY,Navy,Opening and have No Comments

SUB COMMISSIONED ON THIS DAY IN 1954

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The USS Nautilus (above), the world’s first nuclear submarine,was commissioned by the U.S. Navy.

The Nautilus was constructed under the direction of U.S. Navy
Captain Hyman G. Rickover, a Russian-born engineer who
joined the U.S. atomic program in 1946. In 1947, he was put in
charge of the navy’s nuclear-propulsion program and began work
on an atomic submarine. 

In 1952, the Nautiluskeel was laid by President Harry S. Truman,
and on January 21,
1954, first lady Mamie Eisenhower broke a
bottle of champagne across its bow as it was launched into the
Thames River at Groton,
Connecticut
.

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Commissioned,HISTORY,Navy,Nuclear,President,Sub and have No Comments