Archive for the 'CLASSIC ADS' Category

REMEMBER THESE NOVELTY CATALOGS?

Johnson Smith Co. Novelty Catalog (1951) | Vintage advertisements, Vintage  ads, Old ads1950

The Johnson Smith Company was a mail-order company
established in 1914 by
Alfred Johnson Smith (1885-1948)
in
Chicago, Illinois, USA that sold novelty and gag gift
items such as
x-ray goggles
, whoopee cushions, fake
vomit
, and joy buzzers.

The company moved from Chicago to Racine, Wisconsin
in 1926, to
Detroit in the 1930s, and from the Detroit area
to Bradenton, Florida in 1986.

In 2014, the company marked its 100th anniversary. On
December 31, 2019, the company’s website announced
that they had ceased operations and closed. Johnson
Smith was acquired by Collections Etc in 2020.

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Old Johnson Smith Company Novelty Advertising Catalog

 
Old Johnson Smith Company Novelty Advertising Catalog

 
  


posted by Bob Karm in CATALOGS,CLASSIC ADS,HISTORY,Joke,Novelty and have No Comments

SOMETHING BETTER ~ THE RCA VIDEODISC

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Marketed by RCA in the 1980’s.

posted by Bob Karm in CLASSIC ADS,HISTORY,MAGAZINES,TV,Video and have No Comments

ANOTHER GREAT TV WESTERN

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The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok
is a
Western television series
that ran for eight seasons from April 15, 1951, through September
24, 1958. The
Screen Gems series began in syndication, but ran
on
CBS from 1955 through 1958, and, at the same time, on ABC
from 1957 through 1958. The
Kellogg’s cereal company was the
show’s national sponsor.

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The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok starred Guy Madison
(right) as the legendary
Old West lawman (in real life,
also a
gunfighter
) U.S. Marshal James Butler "Wild
Bill" Hickok, and Andy Devine (left) as his comedy
sidekick, Jingles P. Jones. Devine opened each episode
by shouting “Wiiiiiild Biiiiilll Hickok.” He also delivered
the opening commercial for Kellogg’s Sugar Corn Pops.



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Guy Madison (Robert Ozell Moseley)
(January 19, 1922 – February 6, 1996)

Following his retirement, Madison built a large ranch home
in
Morongo Valley, California. He died of emphysema at the
Desert Hospital Hospice in Palm Springs at the age of 74.

posted by Bob Karm in Actors,Cereal,CLASSIC ADS,HISTORY,TV series,WESTERN and have No Comments

IT’S THE FIRST DAY OF SPRING !

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Portable radios were invented by John F. Mitchell in 1941 when  he 
created the first 2-way radio that was small enough for soldiers to
carry with them during World War II. These radios were called the
“Walkie-talkie.” 

Portable radios became available for home use in 1958 when
Raytheon produced a pocket transistorized radio that cost
$49.95.  

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John Francis Mitchell
(January 1, 1928 – June 9, 2009)

posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Blog Reminder,CLASSIC ADS,Communications,CURRENT EVENTS,DEBUT,HISTORY,MILITARY,Portable radios,RADIO and have No Comments

ASPIRIN PATENT FILED ON THIS DAY IN 1899

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Felix Hoffmann
(21 January 1868 – 8 February 1946)


The German company Bayer patents aspirin on March 6, 1899.
Now the most common drug in household medicine cabinets, acetylsalicylic acid was originally made from a chemical found
in the bark of willow trees. In its primitive form, the active
ingredient, salicin, was used for centuries in folk medicine,
beginning in ancient Greece when Hippocrates used it to relieve
pain and fever. Known to doctors since the mid-19th century, it
was used sparingly due to its unpleasant taste and tendency to
damage the stomach.

In 1897, Bayer employee Felix Hoffmann found a way to create a
stable form of the drug that was easier and more pleasant to take.
(Some evidence shows that Hoffmann’s work was really done by
a Jewish chemist, Arthur Eichengrun, whose contributions were
covered up during the Nazi era.)

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Chemistry,CLASSIC ADS,Drugs,HISTORY,Medicine,Patent and have No Comments