Archive for the 'Poster' Category

MOVIE HISTORY MADE ON THIS DAY IN 1939

The Wizard Of Oz Judy Garland 1939 movie vintage poster image 3

On August 25, 1939, The Wizard of Oz, which will become one of
the best-loved movies in history, opened in theaters around the
United States.

Based on the 1900 children’s novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,
by L. Frank Baum (1856-1919), the film starred Judy Garland as
the young
Kansas farm girl Dorothy, who, after being knocked unconscious in a tornado, dreams about following a yellow brick
road, alongside her dog Toto, to the Emerald City to meet the
Wizard of Oz. Along the way, Dorothy encounters a cast of
characters, including the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Cowardly
Lion and the Wicked Witch of the West.

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MUSIC FESTIVAL OPENED ON THIS DAY

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On August 15, 1969, the Woodstock music festival opened on a
patch of farmland in White Lake, a hamlet in the upstate New
York town of Bethel.

Promoters John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, Artie Kornfield and
Michael Lang originally envisioned the festival as a way to raise
funds to build a recording studio and rock-and-roll retreat near
the town of Woodstock, New York. The longtime artists’ colony
was already a home base for Bob Dylan and other musicians.

Despite their relative inexperience, the young promoters managed
to sign a roster of top acts, including the Jefferson Airplane, the
Who, the Grateful Dead, Sly and the Family Stone, Janis Joplin,
Jimi Hendrix, Creedence Clearwater Revival and many more.

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Festival,HISTORY,MUSIC,Musician,Poster and have No Comments

FIRST APPEARANCE OF BUGS BUNNY IN 1940

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While Porky’s Hare Hunt was the first Warner Bros. cartoon to
feature a prototype of Bugs Bunny, A Wild Hare, directed by
Tex Avery character designed by Bob Givensand released on
July 27, 1940, is widely considered to be the first official Bugs
Bunny cartoon. It is the first film where both Elmer Fudd and
Bugs, both redesigned by
Bob Givens, are shown in their fully
developed forms as hunter and tormentor, respectively; the first
in which
Mel Blanc (below) uses what became Bugs’ standard
voice; and the first in which Bugs uses his catchphrase, "What’s
up, Doc?" A Wild Hare was a huge success in theaters and
received an
Academy Award nomination for Best Cartoon
Short Subject.

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LANDMARK FILM RELEASED ON THIS DAY IN 1941

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Months before its release, Orson Welles’ film Citizen Kane began generating such controversy that Radio City Music Hall eventually refused to show it. Instead, Citizen Kane, now revered as one of
the greatest movies in history, made its debut at the smaller RKO
Palace Theater on May 1, 1941.

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George Orson Welles
(May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985)

Orson Welles  is considered to be among the
greatest and most influential filmmakers of
all time.

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THE MODEL FOR ICONIC ARMY POSTER

Walter Botts, the Man Who Modeled Uncle Sam's Pose for J.M. Flagg's Famous  Poster ~ Vintage Everyday

The man who modeled as Uncle Sam poses in front of the iconic poster, 1970  - Rare Historical Photos

Walter Botts (1900-72)  posing as Uncle Sam in front of the
iconic poster, ca. 1970.


Artist James Montgomery Flagg referred to his own mirror image
for the portrait of “Uncle Sam” he created for the cover of the July
6, 1916 issue of Leslie’s Weekly. The figure in the long-tailed coat,
stove pipe hat and sideburns was captioned “What Are You Doing
for Preparedness?”
When asked to update the highly effective image for use in World
War 2, Flagg hired a Hoosier-born veteran who’d posed for Norman Rockwell. According to his widow’s memoir, Walter Botts was
chosen over other models for Flagg’s Army poster “because he
had the longest arms, the longest nose, and the bushiest
eyebrows.”

Botts reportedly suggested the pointing gesture when the artist
asked “Walt, what are you going to do with your long arms,
sitting there?”

James Montgomery Flagg
James Montgomery Flagg
(June 18, 1877 – May 27, 1960)

posted by Bob Karm in Artist,HISTORY,MILITARY,Model,Poster,Recruiting,U.S. Army,WAR and have No Comments