Archive for the 'Congress' Category

THE GREAT SEAL ADOPTED ON THIS DAY IN 1782

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(E pluribus unum, a Latin phrase meaning “Out of Many One.”)

On June 20, 1782, Congress adopted the Great Seal of the United 
States after six years of discussion.

Late on the afternoon of July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress appointed Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams
"to bring in a device for a seal for the United States of America."

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Congress,Government,Great Seal,HISTORY and have No Comments

CONGRESS ADOPTED THE STARS & STRIPES

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Betsy Ross and General George Washington

June 14, 1777: During the American Revolution, the
Continental Congress adopts a resolution stating that
“the flag of the United States be thirteen alternate
stripes red and white” and that “the Union be thirteen
stars, white in a blue field, representing a new
Constellation.” The national flag, which became
known as the “Stars and Stripes,” was based on the
“Grand Union” flag, a banner carried by the Continental
Army in 1776 that also consisted of 13 red and white
stripes. According to legend.

Philadelphia seamstress Betsy Ross designed the new
canton for the Stars and Stripes, which consisted of a
circle of 13 stars and a blue background, at the request
of General
George Washington
. Historians have been
unable to conclusively prove or disprove this legend.




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WAR DECLARED WITH MEXICO ON THIS DAY

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On May 13, 1846, the U.S. Congress overwhelmingly voted in favor
of President
James K. Polk’s request to declare war on Mexico in a dispute over Texas.

Under the threat of war, the United States had refrained from
annexing Texas after the latter won independence from Mexico in
1836. But in 1844, President
John Tyler restarted negotiations with
the Republic of Texas, culminating with a Treaty of Annexation.

The treaty was defeated by a wide margin in the Senate because it
would upset the slave state/free state balance between North and
South and risked war with Mexico, which had broken off relations
with the United States. But shortly before leaving office and with
the support of President-elect Polk, Tyler managed to get the joint resolution passed on March 1, 1845.
Texas was admitted to the
Union
on December 29. 

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James Knox Polk
(November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849)

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Congress,Declaration of war,HISTORY,WAR and have No Comments

FATHER OF THE CONSTITUTION WAS BORN

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On this day in 1751, James Madison, drafter of the Constitution,
recorder of the Constitutional Convention, author of the Federalist 
Papers and fourth president of the United States, was born on a
plantation in
Virginia.

Madison first distinguished himself as a student at the College
of
New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he successfully completed a four-year course of study in two years and, in 1769,
helped found the American Whig Society, the second literary and
debate society at Princeton (and the world), to rival the previously established Cliosophic Society.

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posted by Bob Karm in BIRTHDAY,Congress,Founding Fathers,HOLIDAY,POLITICAL,President,U.S. Constitution and have No Comments

HISTORY WAS MADE ON THIS DAY IN 1965

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On March 15, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed a
joint session of Congress to urge the passage of legislation
guaranteeing voting rights for all.

Using the phrase “we shall overcome,” borrowed from African
American leaders struggling for equal rights, Johnson declares
that “every American citizen must have an equal right to vote.”

Johnson reminds the nation that the Fifteenth Amendment, which
was passed after the
Civil War, gave all citizens the right to vote
regardless of race or color.

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President Johnson (right) meeting with civil rights leaders.

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President Lyndon Johnson signing the 1965
Civil Rights Bill, also known as The Voting
Rights Act.

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