Archive for the 'Navy ships' Category

HISTORY WAS MADE ON THIS DAY

today in history

Tim maguire
TIM MAGUIRE

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posted by Bob Karm in BIRTHDAY,Bombing,DEATH,HISTORY,Navy ships,Opera,Soviet Union,United Nations and have No Comments

CREW SAVED BY JFK ON THIS DAY IN 1943

Did JFK's Order Sink PT-109? | Naval History Magazine - February ...
Lieutenant John F. Kennedy, right, and his PT-109 crew are shown somewhere in the South Pacific, July 1943.

On August 1, 1943, a Japanese destroyer rams an American PT (patrol
torpedo) boat, No. 109, slicing it in two. The destruction is so massive
other American PT boats in the area assume the crew is dead. Two
crewmen were, in fact, killed, but 11 survived, including Lt.
John F.
Kennedy
. His actions made him a war hero.

 

How JFK Earned Two Medals in World War II - HISTORY

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Combat,Disaster at sea,Hero,HISTORY,Navy ships,President,WAR and have No Comments

FIRST NUCLEAR SUBMARINE COMMISSIONED

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The launching of USS Nautilus.     

The USS Nautilus, the world’s first nuclear submarine, was commissioned
by the U.S. Navy on September 30, 1954.

The Nautilus was constructed under the direction of U.S. Navy Captain
Hyman G. Rickover, a brilliant Russian-born engineer who joined the U.S.
atomic program in 1946. In 1947, he was put in charge of the navy’s nuclear-propulsion program and began work on an atomic submarine. Regarded as
a fanatic by his detractors, Rickover succeeded in developing and delivering
the world’s first nuclear submarine years ahead of schedule. In 1952, the
Nautilus‘ keel was laid by President Harry S. Truman, and on January 21,
1954, first lady
Mamie Eisenhower broke a bottle of champagne across its
bow as it was launched into the Thames River at Groton,
Connecticut. Commissioned on September 30, 1954, it first ran under nuclear power
on the morning of January 17, 1955.

Image result for uss nautilus

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Hyman G. Rickover
(January 27, 1900 – July 8, 1986)

Rickover is known as the "Father of the
Nuclear Navy," and his influence on the
Navy and its warships was of such scope
that he "may well go down in history as
one of the Navy’s most important officers."

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Harry S. Truman
(May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972)

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Atomic,Comission,HISTORY,Navy ships,Nuclear,President and have Comment (1)

PT-109 WAS ATTACKED ON THIS DAY IN 1943

PT-109 crew.jpg
LTJG Kennedy (standing at far right) with his crew on PT-109 in 1943.

On this day in 1943, future President John F. Kennedy was serving as the
commander of a torpedo boat in the Solomon Islands when his ship was
fired upon by the Japanese navy.   
 

As a young man, Kennedy had desperately wanted to go into the Navy but
was originally rejected because of chronic health problems, particularly a
back injury he had sustained playing football while attending Harvard
University. In 1941, though, his politically connected father used his
influence to get Jack, as he  was called, into the Navy. In 1942,
Kennedy volunteered for PT (motorized torpedo) boat duty in the
Pacific.   

WWII-1943-John-F-Kennedy-PT-109-Patrol-Torpedo-Boat-Attack-Craft-Warship-Stamp

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posted by Bob Karm in Air strikes,ANNIVERSARY,Attack,HISTORY,Navy ships,President,Stamps,WAR and have No Comments

ROSE FESTIVAL “FLEET WEEK” IN PORTLAND

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A 1935 aerial photo shows Navy ships arriving at the Portland waterfront for the Rose Festival. (From Vintage Portland)


“Fleet Week” is the perfect time to thank the men and women who dedicate
their lives to protecting our city, state, and country.

Business District and Waterfront, Portland, Oregon - Ralph Eddy
Taken during Portland’s first "Fleet Week", this picture shows the destroyer Reuben James and other Navy ships in front of the
City’s downtown business district. A total of 18 Naval ships a
attended for what has become a key part of the annual Rose
Festival.

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,CURRENT EVENTS,HISTORY,MILITARY,Navy ships and have No Comments