Archive for the 'WAR' Category

REMAINS OF A SAILOR TO BE BURIED TODAY

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Undated photo released by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The remains of a sailor from Massachusetts
who died when the USS Oklahoma was struck by multiple torpedoes during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 are being buried
at Arlington National Cemetery on today.

The interment comes more than 80 years after the attack that drew
the U.S. into World War II and nearly four years after the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced that Electrician’s Mate
18 year old 3rd Class Roman W. Sadlowski, of Pittsfield, had
been accounted for using advanced DNA and anthropological
analysis, as well as circumstantial and material evidence. 

     

        
        
        
        
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posted by Bob Karm in Barial,Battleship,CURRENT EVENTS,DEATH,HISTORY,WAR and have No Comments

NATIONAL ANTHEM WRITTEN ON THIS DAY

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"The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United
States
. The lyrics came from the "Defence of Fort M’Henry", a
poem written on September 14, 1814, by 35-year-old lawyer and
amateur poet
Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment
of
Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Outer
Baltimore Harbor in the Patapsco River during the Battle of
Baltimore
in the War of 1812 (below). Key was inspired by the large
U.S. flag, with 15 stars and 15 stripes, known as the Star-Spangled
Banner, flying triumphantly above the fort during the U.S. victory.        

The poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by
John Stafford Smith.


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Francis Scott Key   (1779 – 1843)

Francis Scott Key was born at Terra Rubra, his
family’s estate in Frederick County (now Carroll
County), Maryland.

He became a successful lawyer in Maryland and
Washington, D.C., and was later appointed U.S.
attorney for the District of Columbia.


   
    
    
    
    
    


       

posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Anthem,Battle,Flag,HISTORY,Lawyer,Poem,WAR and have No Comments

PROTOTYPE TANK DEBUTED ON THIS DAY IN 1915

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WW1 British first prototype tank called Little Willie. It was an
Armored Personnel Carrier. It can be found at the Tank
Museum, Bovington, Wareham, United Kingdom.

On September 6, 1915, a prototype tank nicknamed Little Willie
rolled off the assembly line in England. Little Willie was far from
an overnight success. It weighed 14 tons, got stuck in trenches
and crawled over rough terrain at only two miles per hour.

However, improvements were made to the original prototype
and tanks eventually transformed military battlefields.

The British developed the tank in response to the trench
warfare of
World War I. In 1914, a British army colonel named
Ernest
 
Swinton and William Hankey, secretary of the Committee
for
 Imperial Defence, championed the idea of an armored vehicle   
with conveyor-belt-like tracks over its wheels that could break 
through enemy lines and traverse difficult territory.        

The men appealed to British navy minister Winston Churchill,
who believed in the concept of a “land boat” and organized a
Landships Committee to begin developing a prototype. To keep
the project secret from enemies, production workers were
reportedly told the vehicles they were building would be used
to carry water on the battlefield (alternate theories suggest the
shells of the new vehicles resembled water tanks). Either  
way, the new vehicles were shipped in crates labeled “tank”
and the name stuck.

  

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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,DEBUT,HISTORY,Mesuem,MILITARY,Prototype,Tank,WAR and have No Comments

HISTORY WAS MADE ON THIS DAY

today in history

Camilli-Bohannon-ap1      AP-Logo1
CAMILLE
BOHANNON

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The Great Fire of London was a major conflagration that swept
through the central parts of
London from Sunday, 2 September
to Thursday, 6 September 1666. The fire gutted the medieval
City of London inside the old Roman city wall. The death toll is
generally thought to have been relatively small, although some
historians have challenged this belief.

The fire started in a bakery shortly after midnight on Sunday, 2 September, and spread rapidly.

posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Civil war,DEATH,Disaster,Disaster at sea,Fire,HISTORY,Surrender,WAR and have No Comments

BRITISH TROOPS SET FIRE TO WHITE HOUSE

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On August 24, 1814, during the War of 1812 between the United
States and England, British troops entered
Washington, D.C.
and burned the
White House in retaliation for the American
attack on the city of York in Ontario, Canada, in June 1813.

When the British arrived at the White House, they found that
President
James Madison and his first lady Dolley had already
fled to safety in
Maryland. Soldiers reportedly sat down to eat
a meal made of leftover food from the White House scullery
using White House dishes and silver before ransacking the
presidential mansion and setting it ablaze.

White House ruins during the war of 1812
The fire ruined the white house and the grounds. (Library of Congress)

James Madison portrait
James Madison Jr.
(March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836)


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posted by Bob Karm in ANNIVERSARY,Building,Fire,HISTORY,MILITARY,President,WAR and have No Comments